Art Conservation/Restoration

An intriguing story recently appeared in the International New York Times regarding a long disputed painting that was recently found to be an authentic Rembrandt after all.  The controversial painting was cut down the middle and through its center in the 19th century and was likely to be sold as two Rembrandt paintings.  During the next 40 years or so, the painting was pieced back together with an entirely different canvas and covered with paint to hide the previous separation.

In 1898, the director of the Mauritshuis Royal Picture Gallery (“the Mauritshuis”) in The Hague in the Netherlands displayed the painting in the museum in which it was entitled “Saul and David,” one of Rembrandt’s most significant biblical works.  Decades later in 1969, a leading Rembrandt authority discredited the painting, after which the painting hung for years in the museum by an accompanying label entitled “Rembrandt and/or Studio,” which was in effect a “serious demotion.”

After several years of close examination and meticulous restoration by the museum’s own team of conservators along with support from researchers from various outside institutions (i.e., Delft University of Technology, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the Netherlands Institute for Art History, and Cornell University), the Mauritshuis has recently “reclaimed the painting as an authentic Rembrandt, saying it was painted in two stages by the master’s own hand, one of hundreds of surviving Rembrandt paintings.”  It is believed that Rembrandt began the work in 1645 and completed it in 1652.

Shortly after revealing its findings early last week, the Mauritshuis opened its summer exhibition entitled “Rembrandt?  The Case of Saul and David.”  The exhibition is focused entirely on this single work, which depicts the “young hero David playing a harp for an elderly King Saul, who is moved by the music and uses a curtain to wipe away his tears.”  According to the museum’s website, the exhibition “shows how, using the latest technology and research methods, fascinating discoveries were made about the creation, the history and the attribution of the painting.”

To see photos of the painting before and after the meticulous restoration and read further on the restoration and attribution process, click here.